Last edited by Zulugrel
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

6 edition of Traders, Planters and Slaves found in the catalog.

Traders, Planters and Slaves

Market Behavior in Early English America

by David W. Galenson

  • 353 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • American history: c 1500 to c 1800,
  • Economic History,
  • Slavery & emancipation,
  • Social history,
  • c 1600 to c 1700,
  • c 1700 to c 1800,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Business / Economics / Finance,
  • Business/Economics,
  • Africa,
  • Caribbean islands,
  • USA,
  • United States - Colonial Period,
  • Business & Economics / Economic History,
  • History / United States / Colonial Period (1600-1775),
  • History : United States - Colonial Period

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages244
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7768042M
    ISBN 10052189414X
    ISBN 109780521894142
    OCLC/WorldCa49550029

    However, although some slave owners were less cruel than others, nearly all were obsessed by the need to keep slaves from stealing their property, running away or rising up in rebellion. So even the most mild-tempered slave owner would use physical punishment as part of plantation discipline. Focusing on the master-slave relationship in Louisiana's antebellum sugarcane country, The Sugar Masters explores how a modern, capitalist mind-set among planters meshed with old-style paternalistic attitudes to create one of the South's most insidiously oppressive labor systems. Richard Follett explains that in exchange for increased productivity and efficiency sugar planters offered their.

    Planters in the Upper South states started selling slaves to the Deep South, generally through slave traders such as Franklin and Armfield. Louisville, Kentucky, on the Ohio River was a major slave market and port for shipping slaves downriver by the Mississippi to the South. The fact that abolition limited the inflow of new slaves into the Jamaican colony also meant that planters had a vested interest in preserving the well being of their remaining slaves. As a result of these late legalistic developments, post-slave trade Jamaican planters were more lenient in their punishment of rebellious slaves than during.

      And so the planters turned to the import and purchase of Negro slaves. In Virginia there had been 50 Negroes, the bulk of them slaves, out of a total population of 2, in ; Negroes out of 27, in ; and 3, Negroes out of 44, in —a steadily rising proportion, but still limited to less than seven percent of the population. Coming close on the heels of the bicentenary of the British abolition of slave trade, Sherwood's book raises serious questions about the extent of British involvement in the slave trade after Those interested in British or African history will find After Abolition a worthwhile read.


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Traders, Planters and Slaves by David W. Galenson Download PDF EPUB FB2

'Traders, Planters, and Slaves analyzes nea transactions of the Royal African Company to explore the operations of the slave trade, the economy of the sugar islands, and the efficiency of markets in early modern history. It illuminates all three subjects and is essential reading for students of the Atlantic world during the colonial by: This Planters and Slaves book explores the operation of that industry in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, focusing on the market behaviour of the Royal African Company - Traders largest English company engaged in the slave trade - and the sugar Traders of the Caribbean, who were the trade's principal customers in English America.

'Traders, Planters, and Slaves analyzes nea transactions of the Royal African Company to explore the operations of the slave trade, the economy of the sugar islands, and the efficiency of markets in early modern history.

It illuminates all three subjects and is essential reading for students of the Atlantic world during the colonial era. Peter Faneuil (), Colonial American slave trader and owner, and namesake of Boston's Faneuil Hall. [29] Rebecca Latimer Felton (–), suffragette, white supremacist, and Senator for Georgia, she was the last member of the U.S.

Congress to have been a slave owner. [PDF] Traders Planters and Slaves: Market Behavior in Early English America [Read] Full Ebook. Slavery among Native Americans in the United States includes slavery by and slavery of Native Americans roughly within what is currently the United States of America.

Tribal territories and the slave trade ranged over present-day borders. Some Native American tribes held war captives as slaves prior to and during European Native Americans were captured and sold by others. The financialization of slave-assets thus allowed profiting from slavery even in places that had formally outlawed the slave trade—as had the United States, in The complex, sophisticated commercial systems that had developed along with colonial slave economies did not die when the slave trade was abolished; they merely operated from a.

A careful study of one of South Carolina’s most important planters, the man who declared that cotton was “king,” this book pays close attention both to life on the plantation and Hammond’s.

It wasnt only the Atlantic Slave Trade that they dominated. They were heavily involved in the trade of Christian slaves between Europe and Africa/the East in the Mediaeval era, and also kept Christian Slaves on their own estates (and said Christians had to abide Jewish custom – including circumcisions), and despite the apparently bigoted, zealous Christians we always hear about, and the.

9 ‘Facts’ About Slavery They Don’t Want You to Know A widely circulated list of historical "facts" about slavery dwells on the participation of non-whites as owners and traders of slaves in. The significant point is not that a few Jewish slave dealers changed the course of history, which would have been the same without Jewish slave traders and planters.

The significant point is that Jews found the threshold of liberation from second-class status or worse, in a region dependent on black slavery. Traders, planters and slaves: market behavior in early English America. [David W Galenson] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help.

Search. Search This book explores the operation of the Atlantic slave trade industry in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The thousands of British families who grew rich on the slave trade, or from the sale of slave-produced sugar, in the 17th and 18th centuries, brushed those uncomfortable chapters of.

The slave trade was the business of acquiring, transporting and selling human beings, i.e., how they became slaves. This is a great list for self-education on the slave experience. It is relatively useless as a focused resource for finding books -- e.g., Thomas' The Slave Trade and Northrup's The Atlantic Slave Trade (which are here) or William.

Merchants invested money in slaving voyages, in equipping the ship and in the goods that were traded with Africa. The roles of slave traders, ship owners, and merchants often overlapped.

In West Africa, those involved were the caboceers (traders) on the coast and the enslaved Africans who were captured and sold to the slave ships. A map of the United States that shows 'free states,' 'slave states,' and 'undecided' ones, as it appeared in the book 'American Slavery and Colour,' by William Chambers, Stock Montage/Getty.

The planters’ dread of rebel combinations between the Irish poor and African slaves – like their more general tendency to perceive slave plots all around them – was more often based on.

Relying on slave labor, the so-called Narragansett Planters raised livestock and produced surplus crops and cheese for Newport's growing sea trade. Newport Historical Society As the Newport slave merchants prospered in the early s, the Narragansett Planters had success selling their crops and horses to slave plantations in the West Indies.

The leading Lords Proprietors had been planters and slave traders in the West Indies, and they included the "peculiar institution" in their plans for their mainland colony. In Virginia and South Carolina, slave plantations were central features of society from the early eighteenth century onward.

Cultivating tobacco to the north and rice to the. low planters, relative to the prices they charged slave traders, so speculators sometimes posed as Deep South planters. Upper South slave owners assumed they could easily distin-guish between a genteel Southern planter and an uncouth slave trader, but often there was not much difference.

A slave trader is “very much like other men. He is today a. They got into the domestic slave trade just as the cotton economy — and American demand for enslaved labor — exploded, and quit right before .Through the case of Rice C. Ballard, who was able to make the transition from a slave trader in Virginia to a cotton planter in the West, this dissertation will show that skills and networks established from the slave-trading business enabled the traders to acquire managerial abilities and the ethos associated with nascent global capitalism.Merchants, planters, and politicians actively directed the city's involvement in the trade untilwhen the Georgia legislature banned the slave trade from Africa.

The demand for African slave labor increased with the establishment of rice and Sea Island cotton plantations in the Georgia Lowcountry.